Protect the Forest - now!

Forest ecosystems cover 70% of Swedish land. Natural forests store large amounts of carbon, they affect the climate, clean the air we breathe and the water we drink. Forests are also home to a myriad of lifeforms and they are the foundation for ecosystem functions that we depend on.

Climate and Forest

The natural forests of the world play a key role in stabilising the climate. Clearcuts and the paper industry cause enormous emissions of greenhouse gases.

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Biodiversity

Forests are the largest land-based ecosystem in Sweden hosting a rich biodiversity. But forest plants, fungi and animals are all threatened by intensive forestry.

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Multi-use of forest resources

A healthy forest ecosystem is the foundation for humans to thrive as long as it is managed within the local ecosystem boundaries.

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Feedback on EU’s 2030 Climate Target Plan

Protecting forests is essential to safeguard biodiversity and mitigate climate change, writes Protect the Forest in its feedback on EU’s 2030 Climate Target Plan. Protect the Forest has given feedback on EU’s 2030 Climate Target Plan. Read the full feedback from Protect the Forest here: There is a climate and biodiversity crisis in the world, and

United Nations’ International Day for Forests

Forest with wood anemones (Anemone nemorosa). Foto: Birgitta Tulin. Today, the 21st of March, is the United Nations’ International Day for Forests. The forest is home to about 80 percent of the world’s terrestrial species. The forests comprise over 60,000 known tree species. Deforestation continues at an alarming rate, causing large emissions of greenhouse gases.

Open letter to Sveaskog: You are acting unjustly against our indigenous people

One of the forests planned for logging at Maskaure. Photo: Björn Mildh The state-owned forestry company Sveaskog will sell and harvest a total of 2,600 hectares of woodland in Maskaure Sami village in Arjeplog municipality, Norrbotten, Sweden. This is no coincidence, write Leif Lundberg from Maskaure Sami village, Johanna Nilsson, Marcus Lidström and Björn Mildh